Author Archives: NewsEdit

Fixed for Free

Repair Café Abergavenny is a volunteer-run service that will do its best to repair household items – electrical, clean clothing, wood, bicycles, ceramics, etc. They meet at the Community Centre in Park Street every 3rd Saturday of the month, 11.00am – 2.00pm.  Contact repaircafeabergavenny@gmail.com – volunteer repairers especially welcome.

Noise Concerns at the Reservoir

A Welsh Water application to allow the Llandegfedd watersports centre to be used for purposes other than those associated with watersports and from 6.00am to midnight instead of from 9.00am to 9.00pm has provoked opposition. Concern centres on the impact that noise and other disturbance that might have on the reservoir SSSI birdlife, especially at dawn and dusk. The application documents are at https://planningonline.monmouthshire.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=Q3U9EPKYHLA00

The Latest from CALM

At a recent meeting CALM, the group that opposed the M4 Relief Road, expressed concern that the Burns Commission needed to be more effective at engaging with the public while preparing its proposals for transport in the M4 Corridor. CALM fears that a Conservative government in Wales might reintroduce the Relief Road project and is seeking confirmation that the Black Route is no longer protected and that land bought for the road is being sold. CALM is also exploring the possibility of strengthening protection of the Levels by a stronger designation than SSSIs.

51,000 Oaks for Monmouthshire and Newport

While the National Trust aims to plant perhaps a million trees in Wales by 2030, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is looking to plant tens of thousands of new oak trees across South East and South-Central Wales, creating new woodland habitats and restoring broadleaf areas for wildlife and for people. Two years ago, NRW staff volunteered to collect acorns from trees of excellent quality from around Newport and Monmouth and send them to grow at a tree nursery in Delamere. Trees were assessed on several features, including their shape, size, age and the size of their leaves. Oak trees that perform well in these categories produce acorns that are more likely to grow into high quality trees.
Out of the 70,000 acorns collected, 51,000 have successfully matured and are set to be replanted near their original collection site. Replanting these trees near the sites they came from ensures they are well suited to the environment and that there is a minimal risk of spreading plant diseases. The two main sites the acorns were collected from were the Rolls of Monmouth and Newport Golf clubs.

MP Backs Government 2050 Target

Newly appointed Welsh Office Minister, David TC Davies MP for Monmouth, has ‘fully supported’ the UK Government’s ambition to become carbon neutral by 2050 – despite being a long-standing denier of man-made climate change and an opponent of climate emergency declarations.

Commissioner Backed by Western Mail

A Western Mail editorial has backed Future Generations Commissioner Sophie Howe’s concern about the lack of carbon impact assessments published to accompany infrastructure projects.  Having declared a climate emergency, every spending decision should consider the impact that it will make on the emergency.  And such measures ‘should not be optional add-ons that can be disregarded if too much of a nuisance’.  The First Minister would have ‘looked ridiculous’ if approval had been given to the M4 Relief Road.

Latest on Climate Change from WG

The Welsh Government has published Prosperity for All: A Climate Conscious Wales 2020-2025 in association with the Madrid Climate Change Conference. It continues the momentum generated by the launch of Prosperity for All: A Low Carbon Wales, the declaration of a climate change emergency earlier this year and the first Wales Climate Change Conference.
The plan sets out how we will protect our environment and adapt our homes, communities, businesses and infrastructure to deal with the impact of climate change through a range of actions including:
• building defences to guard against flooding and coastal erosion
• protecting water supplies from drought
• reducing the use of pesticides
• growing more woodland to improve air quality, reduce erosion and protect soil, slow down floods and support our ecosystems.
• creating more open spaces like parks, playing fields, allotments, private gardens, grasslands, ponds, woodland creating an environment that is good for people’s wellbeing as well as the climate.
• the creation of 25,000 more energy efficient homes by 2021.